Been messing with 4th Dimensional Chemistry. It’s fun. Oh, and magnetic monopoles—with pictures!

So I mess about with simulated capacitors, whatever else I can think of, and their energy potentials and build things that may not be able to be made today, but if they were would be of use to people in the future or now if I could get a more powerful rig to show the possibilities of their derivatives. That includes magnetic monopoles. Yes. No, not in spin ice. Similar—but different enough that I could patent the suckers tomorrow and they’d be under my name. But we know that’s not my style.

So let’s play the game.

Let’s start with a little 4th Dimensional Chemistry. All you need (Currently: First Iteration [Did I mention first try].) is a Bismuth Core, Ruthenium Outer Sheath to connect the Geometry to the outer sides of what I would have to call icicles but in reality is Arsenic crystals if you want extra hydrogen joins or just optional join points. The other is a carbon crystal of the same build that offered a single Delta Epsilon of roughly 9.8 (I don’t know what that means. I’ve looked it up 4 times and it’s just not sticking. if I could ask someone I would.) for and output of 98919 kJ/mol or roughly 27 KwH. If you run electricity through them they expand violently and up the power of a single mole to roughly 150,000 kJ/mol and then return to their shape once the power is through. So perhaps useful in space where they can expand as a net to gather debris if carbide is used to bind them properly. Though the output requires a vastly larger Delta Epsilon. Hydrogen is a better carrier. They are interconnectable into a three tiered lattice. I doubt they would last too long due to the half life of arsenic being 10 Days and Ruthenium only 2 Years, but the cores can be reused if not garbage Bismuth as they have an unheavenly long half life that’s worth looking up. Go on. It’s so long and I’m so lazy. Here’s a picture of the design with no numbers because then I’d have to start up my Wacom and open the app and re run it and then snap the screen and I’m like—nah, you try it. It’s more fun that way.

Credit: -J Townsend. 4th Dimensional Chemistry 02/14/2020. 1:45 a.m. Totally Doable. But is it worth while for this particular build. I don’t think so.

So you say how do I build this? That’s easy enough, theoretically since I don’t have the tools at hand.
A Bi core can be made through 3D printing or layering of gels that hold the atoms in place, if you want to get insanely technical we can do it on the space station using lasers to slow the fall of the atoms into the right places at once so they bond as needed. Doing the same for the Ruthenium and then you have a solid inert core that can have the other crystal “icicles” bonded properly as needed. Then they can be repeated as needed until you have your weave/lattice/or 3D construction. But realize if you you reverse the directions of these builds and jolt them alternating the level of power you’ll get a self walking chemical nanobot. You just divide sections by inserted inert atoms and you have lines of travel that can be independently controlled. Fun times. I’ll have to get to the monopoles—With picutres! Tomorrow. Err later today. It’s almost 2 a.m. and I need to get some sleep. Have a good Night/Day. Yours, -J.